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                      Chinese Idiom
                      魚目混珠 (yú mù hùn zhū)
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                      alt

                      In the Han Dynasty (hàn cháo 漢朝), there was a Taoist called Wei Boyang who wrote a book on the making of pills of immortality. In this book there is the following line:” Fish eyes can’t be passed off as pearls, and bitter flea-bane can’t pretend to be tea.” Fish eyes look like pears, but are valueless.This idiom is used to mean passing off the sham as the genuine.

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                      余音繞梁 (yú yīn rào liáng)
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                      music in heaven

                      In the warring State Period (zhàn guó 戰國) , there was a girl in the State of Qi called Han E (hàn é 韓娥) who sang beautifully. Once when she was passing through the State of Qi she had to sing to earn money to buy food. When she left Qi the echoes of her songs clung to the beams of the houses there for three days before people realized that she had left.
                      This idiom is used to describe unforgettably beaurifull singing.

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                      債臺高筑 (zhài tái gāo zhù)
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                      altWhen the Warring States Period (zhàn guó 戰國) began, it was already nearing the end of the Chou dynasty (zhōu cháo 周朝).

                      Although Chou King Nan was the ruler, he had very little real power. The Seven Great States into which China was divided were all very powerful; especially the kingdom of Ch'in, which planned to swallow up the other six and become ruler of all China.

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                      朝三暮四(zhāo sān mù sì)
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                      altOnce upon a time, there lived an old man in Song Kingdom, who raised a lot of monkeys at home. The old man fed each monkey eight acorns every day, four in the morning and four in the evening. Later he fed so many monkeys that he had not enough acorns. So he wanted to feed monkeys seven acorns each day. Then he discussed with his monkeys, “From today on, I will give each of you four acorns in the morning and three acorns in the evening. Is that O.K.?” Hearing this, all the monkeys got angry. How come lack one in the evening? Then the old man changed to say, “I'll give each of you four acorns in the morning and three acorns in the evening.” Thinking that there were still four in the evening, all the monkeys became happy again.Three in the morning, four in the evening: The idiom originally means to fool others by playing tricks. It later extends to mean changing one’s mind frequently or not being responsible.Other expressions: to play fast and loose or to chop and change.

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                      枕戈待旦 (zhěn gē dài dàn)
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                      alt

                      In the Western Jin Dynasty (xī jìn 西晉) there were two young men.One of them was Zu Ti and the other was Liu Kun. Both of them were men of ideals and integrity who were chivalrous and of a sanguine disposition. They not only wrote excellent articles but also were fond of practising martial arts to keep fit, in order to render meritorious service to the country. Both of them were chief clerks responsible for document administration in Luoyang. Although in appearance the Jin
                      Dynasty had jurisdiction of the Central Plains comprising the middle and lower reaches of the Haunch and threatened by foreign invasion.

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                      鄭人買履(zhèng rén mǎi lǚ)
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                      alt

                      A man of the state of Zheng (zhèng guó 鄭國) wanted to buy a pair of shoes. He measured his foot and put the measurement on a chair. When he set out for the market he forgot to bring it along.

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